The Remedy for Love: Bill Roorbach

The Remedy For Love

The Remedy For LoveAuthor: Bill Roorbach
Book Name: The Remedy for Love
Series: **
Order: **
Genre: Romance
Rating:  Good
3+stars

 

Blurb:  When the “Storm of the Century” threatens western Maine, Eric closes his office early and heads to the grocery store. In line ahead of him, an unkempt and seemingly unstable young woman comes up short on cash, so Eric offers her twenty bucks and a ride home. Trouble is, Danielle doesn’t really have a home. She’s squatting in a cabin deep in the woods: no electricity, no plumbing, no heat. Eric, with problems of his own, tries to walk away, but finds he can’t. Fending off her mistrust of him, he gets her set up with food, water, and firewood, and departs with relief. But when he climbs back to the road, his car is gone, and in desperation he returns to the cabin. As the storm intensifies, these two lost souls are forced to wait it out together.

Deeply moving, frequently funny, The Remedy for Love is a story about the secrets revealed when there is no time or space for anything but the truth.

Review:  This is absolutely a departure from the typical types of books I’d pick up.  That made it hard for me to decide where I wanted to rate it.  Though a bit difficult to get into and figure out the flow of the writing style, it was a really well written book.  For that, I could have easily rated this higher.  But from a personal preference standpoint, there were things that I just wasn’t a fan of.

The difficulty to actually get into it was kind of a big one.  I came close to not finishing because of that and the fact that it seemed to move so slowly.  This is more of a cerebral type of read rather than a truly emotional one.  There is definitely emotion, but you have to connect with it from a more intellectual standpoint.  There is absolutely nothing wrong with that, it just isn’t typically the type of book that I want to read.

I was really confused at lots of points because the writing left things feeling rather vague.  The reader was responsible for reading between the lines in a lot of places and it wasn’t always possible to really get the full gist of what the author was trying to convey.  While it left the door open for all kinds of possibilities, sometimes that was just too many variables.  At one point, with my twisted imagination, I had the heroine in the story fixed in my head as an abused spouse that broke and rather gruesomely murdered her husband.  We never really know if she is truly insane or just a little messed up.  There was just so much there that isn’t defined, leaving the potential for the reader to go off in a completely wrong direction and when they find out that it is wrong, struggling to get back on the correct path of the story.

Since I was reading the digital version, you can only assume that the end of the book is somewhere around the 100% mark.  So, I’m getting near the end, see I still have about 10% left of the book, turn the page and I’m at the acknowledgements.  Over and done and I have no clue how that happened.  I even went back thinking I did something weird to flip to the next page and jumped to the end.  Nope.  It just ended, at a really odd point, without any real resolution to several of the smaller, but still important plot lines that were developed in the rest of the story.  Sure, as a reader that leaves the ending up to your own imagination, but to me, that is less than satisfying.

With that lack of a solid ending and so much of the vagueness throughout the rest of the story, if I think back on it as a whole, it was actually kind of boring.  Sure there was drama and some heavy issues, but the lack of actual substance sort of negates that.

Will I read other books by this author?  Maybe.  If I’m in the mood to challenge and push my intellect.  Since I usually choose books for entertainment or emotional reasons, the chances of that just aren’t that high.

 

Author: TJ Fox

Slightly sane artist, book addict, wife and mother of 3 who is forever rethinking her place in this world.

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